Press

Press

Bakersfield Californian editorial: Vote Yes on Prop. 59; Stem Election Money Flow
“The Citizens United decision, which in part classifies corporations as ‘citizens,’ giving them the ability to contribute to political campaigns, is credited with pouring special interest money into campaigns.  Clearly this buying of America is a bad thing.”

Fresno Bee editorial: “The good government groups backing Prop. 59 make a plausible case that grass-roots voter support is more powerful than just the Legislature’s – and that a resounding “yes” vote in a congressional district could persuade fence-sitting lawmakers to support repeal.

Hanford Sentinel editorial: Yes on Proposition 59.
“Citizens United is the case that decided corporations are the same as people when it comes to campaign contributions and spending. The goal behind its presence on the ballot is to let California lawmakers know what their constituents think of that. Lawmakers are under no obligation to act on that information. Those against say it is a do-nothing proposition that just clutters up the ballot. We disagree. … Proposition 59 won’t change the law and put an end to Citizens United, but it will let lawmakers in California know that their constituents want it gone. Vote yes on Proposition 59”

Los Angeles Times: California Citizens United measure began with a chat at Starbucks
“Voters once frequently used such “voter instruction” measures to tell their members of Congress what to do, but Californians haven’t used it to tell their representatives and senators to change the U.S. Constitution in 124 years. California led the effort to have citizens elect their U.S. senators, rather than have them picked by state lawmakers. When legislators referred a proposition in 1892 asking if the change should be made, 93% of voters said yes, according to figures from the California State Archives. Several states followed California’s lead and put the issue before their voters and, eventually, Congress got the hint. Nearly 17 years later, the 17th Amendment passed, changing how senators are picked.”

Orange County  Register: Guest Commentary — Prop 59 Reminds Politicians Who They Work For by Derek Cressman and Trent Lange
“Passage of Prop. 59 does not guarantee an end to big money politics. Voters will need to stay vigilant and make sure our elected officials listen to us. But one thing is for sure, they won’t listen if we don’t first tell them clearly that we want immediate action to stop billionaires and corporations from buying elections by voting yes on Proposition 59.”

Sacramento Bee: Californians can send a strong message against big money in politics by Jeff Clements and Derek Cressman
“Just as a primary challenger can hold an incumbent who strays from the party platform accountable, members of Congress who ignore the expressed wishes of their constituents will have to answer tough questions if they seek re-election. The time has come to re-establish the concept that elected representatives should actually represent constituents, not impose their own agendas or cater to narrow financial interests. In 2012, voters in Colorado and Montana instructed their representatives to overturn Citizens United by margins of three-to-one. Republican and Democratic legislators responded with calls for a constitutional amendment.”

Sacramento Bee editorial: Take a Stand on Citizens United
“Of the state’s 55 representatives and senators, 34 have signed on to proposals for a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton pledges to pursue a constitutional change if elected, and Republican Donald Trump has also been critical of the ruling. The good government groups backing Prop. 59 make a plausible case that grass-roots voter support is more powerful than just the Legislature’s – and that a resounding “yes” vote in a congressional district could persuade fence-sitting lawmakers to support repeal.”

San Jose Mercury News editorial: Vote yes on Prop 59 to fight Citizens United ruling
“Voters who believe that money is not speech and corporations are not individual people, and who want California to fight for campaign finance reform, should vote yes on Proposition 59. Unlike Citizens United, it can’t do any harm.”

San Francisco Chronicle editorial: Chronicle Recommends: Yes on 59
“The one clear path to restoring control of money in politics would be a constitutional amendment that would assert Americans’ right to regulate donations and spending. It’s a tall order and would require a formidable citizen uprising to demand it. Prop. 59 would affirm this state’s commitment to genuine campaign finance reform. Vote yes.”

New York Times column by Hedrick Smith: Can the states save American Democracy?
“In the most prominent case, California’s 18 million registered voters get to vote in November on whether to instruct their 55-member congressional delegation to “use all of their constitutional authority: to overturn Citizens United.